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In the era of COVID-19, research involving older adults has, for the most part, come to a halt. Many researchers have had to rethink their approach to aging research that is non-COVID-19 related, either by pausing or pivoting research projects that involve face-to-face interactions. While some have turned to writing review papers, meta-analyses, or systematic reviews, another option may be to formulate new research questions involving an aging population that may be answered by examining open access publicly available data provided by government agencies, or by completing secondary data analyses on open access data.

Open access datasets from studies of aging

Open access datasets from studies of aging

  • Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE)

    With 2,832 participants, the ACTIVE Study is the largest study on cognitive training ever performed. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the National Institute on Aging, the Indiana University School of Medicine, Penn State University, and others, the ACTIVE study proves that healthy older adults can make significant cognitive improvements with appropriate cognitive training and practice. It also demonstrates that Posit Science training drives improvements that are significantly better than other types of cognitive exercise.

    Click here for the dataset

  • Americans' Changing Lives: Waves I, II, III, IV, and V, 1986, 1989, 1994, 2002, and 2011

    The Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) survey series is an ongoing nationally representative longitudinal study focusing especially on differences between Black and White Americans in middle and late life. These data constitute the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth waves in a panel survey covering a wide range of sociological, psychological, mental, and physical health items. Wave I of the study began in 1986 with a nation face-to-face survey of 3,617 adults ages 25 and up, with Black Americans and people aged 60 and over over-sampled at twice the rate of the others. Wave II constitutes face-to-face re-interviews in 1989 of those still alive. Survivors have been re-interviewed by telephone, and when necessary face-to-face, in 1994, 2001/02, and 2011, making up Waves III, IV, and V of the data.

    ACL was designed and sought out to investigate the following: (1) the ways in which a wide range of activities and social relationships that people engage in are broadly "productive," (2) how individuals adapt to acute life events and chronic stresses that threaten the maintenance of health, effective functioning, and productive activity, and (3) sociocultural variations in the nature, meaning, determinants, and consequences of productive activity and relationships. Among the topics covered are interpersonal relationships (spouse/partner, children, parents, friends), sources and levels of satisfaction, social interactions and leisure activities, traumatic life events (physical assault, serious illness, divorce, death of a loved one, financial or legal problems), perceptions of retirement, health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight, rest), and utilization of health care services (doctor visits, hospitalization, nursing home institutionalization, bed days). Also included are measures of physical health, psychological well-being, and indices referring to cognitive functioning.

    Demographic information provided for individuals includes household composition, number of children and grandchildren, employment status, occupation and work history, income, family financial situation, religious beliefs and practices, ethnicity, race, education, sex, and region of residence. More information

    Click here for this dataset

  • American Time Use Survey (ATUS) including the NIA-supported Well-Being Module

    The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) provides nationally representative estimates of how, where, and with whom Americans spend their time, and is the only federal survey providing data on the full range of nonmarket activities, from childcare to volunteering. ATUS data files are used by researchers to study a broad range of issues; the data files include information collected from over 136,000 interviews conducted from 2003 to 2012.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Compressed Mortality File

    The Compressed Mortality File (CMF) is comprised of a county-level national mortality file and a corresponding county–level national population file. The mortality file of the CMF contains a select subset of the variables contained in the detailed annual mortality files. Currently, the CMF spans the years 1968- 2016 and is divided into four parts: 1968-78, 1979-88, 1989-98, and 1999-2016. The first two parts are public use files and are available on a CD-ROM (CMF 1968-88 Series 20 No. 2A).  The other two parts can be made available on CD-ROMs to researchers under Part II Use Agreements (CMF 1989-98 Series 20 No. 2E and CMF 1999-2016 Series 20 No. 2V). The CMF is also available on CDC WONDER as an online interactive query data base (see Interactive Data Bases and Tables). The CMF is a relatively compact file as it contains only a select set of variables.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

    National Centre for Health Statistics has linked 1999-2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and 1999-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to administrative data through 2016 for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) largest housing assistance programs: the Housing Choice Voucher program, public housing, and privately owned, subsidized multifamily housing. Linkage of NCHS survey participants with HUD administrative records provides the opportunity to examine relationships between housing and health.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Longitudinal Studies of Aging (LSOA)

    The Longitudinal Studies of Aging (LSOAs) is a collaborative project of National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA). It is a multicohort study of persons 70 years of age and over designed primarily to measure changes in the health, functional status, living arrangements, and health services utilization of two cohorts of Americans as they move into and through the oldest ages.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Mortality

    NCHS has linked various surveys with death certificate records from the National Death Index (NDI). Linkage of the NCHS survey participants with the NDI mortality data provides the opportunity to conduct a vast array of outcome studies designed to investigate the association of a wide variety of health factors with mortality. The restricted-use Linked Mortality File (LMF) has been updated with mortality follow-up data through December 31, 2015.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Mortality (Deaths)

    National-level mortality data help track the characteristics of those who have died, monitor and make decisions about public health challenges, determine life expectancy, and compare death trends with other countries. Learn more

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Natality (Births)

    The Natality online databases report counts of live births occurring within the United States to U.S. residents. Counts can be obtained by a variety of demographic characteristics, such as state and county of residence, mother's race, and mother's age, and health and medical items, such as tobacco use, method of delivery, and congenital anomalies. The data are derived from birth certificates. For more information, refer to Natality data description.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC National Death Index

    The National Death Index (NDI) is a centralized database of death record information on file in state vital statistics offices.  Working with these state offices, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) established the NDI as a resource to aid epidemiologists and other health and medical investigators with their mortality ascertainment activities.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: National Mortality Followback Survey (NMFS)

    The Mortality Followback Survey Program, begun in the 1960’s by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), uses a sample of United States residents who die in a given year to supplement the death certificate with information from the next of kin or another person familiar with the decedent’s life history. This information, sometimes enhanced by administrative records, provides a unique opportunity to study the etiology of disease, demographic trends in mortality, and other health issues.

    The first mortality followback survey, conducted in 1961, featured information on hospital and institutional care in the last year of life. Information from the 1962-63 survey permitted an extensive analysis of socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Data from the 1964-65 survey included expenditures for health care during the last year of life, sources of payment, and health insurance coverage of decedents. The 1966-68 survey provided information on the link between smoking and cancer mortality. In 1986 the survey provided data on co-morbid conditions, disabilities, alcohol use, and access to health care services.

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of ambulatory medical care services in the United States. Findings are based on a sample of visits to nonfederally employed office-based physicians who are primarily engaged in direct patient care and, starting in 2006, a separate sample of visits to community health centers.

    The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital emergency and outpatient departments and ambulatory surgery locations. Findings are based on a national sample of visits to the emergency departments,  outpatient departments, and ambulatory surgery locations of noninstitutional general and short-stay hospitals. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

    The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS data on a broad range of health topics are collected through personal household interviews. Survey results have been instrumental in providing data to track health status, health care access, and progress toward achieving national health objectives.

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS)

    The 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS) is one in a series of nationally representative sample surveys of U.S. home health and hospice agencies. It is designed to provide descriptive information on home health and hospice agencies, their staffs, their services, and their patients. NHHCS was first conducted in 1992 and was repeated in 1993, 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2000, and most recently in 2007. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of ambulatory medical care services in the United States. Findings are based on a sample of visits to nonfederally employed office-based physicians who are primarily engaged in direct patient care and, starting in 2006, a separate sample of visits to community health centers.

    The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital emergency and outpatient departments and ambulatory surgery locations. Findings are based on a national sample of visits to the emergency departments, outpatient departments, and ambulatory surgery locations of noninstitutional general and short-stay hospitals.

    Click here for dataset
  • CDC: National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which was conducted annually from 1965-2010, was a national probability survey designed to meet the need for information on characteristics of inpatients discharged from non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the United States. Data from the NHDS are available annually and are used to examine important topics of interest in public health and for a variety of activities by governmental, scientific, academic, and commercial institutions.

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: National Immunization Survey (NIS)

    The National Immunization Surveys (NIS) are a group of telephone surveys sponsored and conducted by CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). Since 2018 the National Immunization Surveys have used a single frame survey design, that includes calling cell phone numbers for household interviews with parents or guardians. If the parent or guardian provides consent and contact information, a questionnaire is mailed to children’s vaccination providers. Learn more

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS)

    The first national probability survey of nursing assistants working in nursing homes in the United States.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS)

    The National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) is a series of nationally representative sample surveys of United States nursing homes, their services, their staff, and their residents. The NNHS was first conducted in 1973-1974 and repeated in 1977, 1985, 1995, 1997, 1999, and most recently in 2004. Although each of these surveys emphasized different topics, they all provided some common basic information about nursing homes, their residents, and their staff. All nursing homes included in this survey had at least three beds and were either certified (by Medicare or Medicaid) or had a state license to operate as a nursing home.

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS)

    The National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS) is the only national study of ambulatory surgical care in hospital-based and freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). The NSAS was first conducted from 1994 to 1996, but it was discontinued due to lack of resources. The NSAS was conducted again in 2006. Efforts are now underway to include ambulatory surgery centers in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). The NHAMCS website provides more information on the efforts. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: National Survey of Family Growth

    The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) gathers information on family life, marriage and divorce, pregnancy, infertility, use of contraception, and men’s and women’s health. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and others to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies of families, fertility, and health. Links to some of those studies are included on this web site, under “Publications and Information Products."

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: NCHS Data Linked to CMS Medicare Enrollment and Claims Files

    NCHS has linked various surveys with Medicare enrollment and claims records collected from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Linkage of the NCHS survey participants with the CMS Medicare data provides the opportunity to study changes in health status, health care utilization, and expenditures among the elderly U.S. population and persons receiving Medicare disability benefits.

    Medicare enrollment and claims data are available for those NCHS respondents who agreed to provide personal identification data to NCHS and for whom NCHS was able to match with Medicare administrative records. CMS provided NCHS with Medicare benefit claims data for 1999 through 2013 for all successfully matched NCHS survey participants. For certain NCHS surveys, the Medicare administrative files include data from before and after the survey year of interview. CMS also provided to NCHS Medicare Part D data for 2006-2013.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: NCHS Data Linked to United States Renal Data System (USRDS) End-Stage Renal Disease Files

    NCHS has linked various surveys with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) data obtained from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). Linkage of the NCHS survey participants with the USRDS ESRD data provides the opportunity to study changes in health status and health care utilization among patients diagnosed with ESRD. ESRD data are available for those NCHS respondents who agreed to provide personal identification data to NCHS and for whom NCHS was able to match with USRDS administrative records. Available ESRD patient data covers service from 1974 through 2008.

    Click here for the dataset
  • CDC: Second Longitudinal Studies of Aging (LSOA II)

    The Second Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSOA II) is a collaborative effort of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the National Institute on AgingExternal (NIA). The Second Supplement on Aging (SOA II), conducted in conjunction with the 1994 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), served as the baseline for the study. The LSOA II is a prospective study with a nationally representative sample comprised of 9,447 civilian noninstitutionalized persons 70 years of age and over at the time of their SOA II interview. The LSOA II followed this cohort of older persons through two followup interviews, conducted in 1997-98 and 1999-2000. While the baseline interview was administered face-to-face in the home by U.S. Census Bureau interviewers, followup interviews were administered using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI) by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Plans are to augment the interview data by linkage to Medicare recordsExternal, the National Death Index, and multiple cause-of-death records.

    Click here for the dataset

  • CDC: Social Security Administration (SSA)

    National Centre for Health Statistics has linked various surveys with the Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit records collected from the Social Security Administration (SSA). Linkage of the NCHS survey participants with the SSA-OASDI and SSA-SSI data provides the opportunity to further study the elderly and disabled U.S. population.

    Click here for the dataset
  • China Health and Retirement Survey (CHARLS)

    The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) aims to collect a high quality nationally representative sample of Chinese residents ages 45 and older to serve the needs of scientific research on the elderly. The baseline national wave of CHARLS is being fielded in 2011and includes about 10,000 households and 17,500 individuals in 150 counties/districts and 450 villages/resident committees. The individuals will be followed up every two years. All data will be made public one year after the end of data collection.

    Click here for the dataset
  • Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) Series

    The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) began in 1998 and has been funded by a variety of sources over the course of the project. These sources include National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health grants awarded to Duke University, Chinese support, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the China Social Sciences Foundation, the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, and the China Natural Sciences Foundation and the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (RGC).

    The CLHLS provides information on health status and quality of life of the elderly aged 65 and older in 22 provinces of China. The study was initially conducted to shed light on the determinants of healthy human longevity and oldest-old mortality. Data were collected on a larger percentage of the oldest population, including centenarian and nonagenarian, than had previously been studied, with follow-up waves taking place after two to three years. With the oldest-old sub-population growing faster than any other age group, the CLHLS sought to investigate the demographic, socioeconomic psychological and health status of the oldest-old. The goal of the CLHLS is to determine which factors, out of a large set of social, behavioral, biological, and environmental factors, play an important role in healthy longevity. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • Clinical Trial Sequencing Project – Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    The goal of the project is to identify recurrent genetic alterations (mutations, deletions, amplifications, rearrangements) and/or gene expression signatures. National Cancer Institute (NCI) utilized whole genome sequencing and/or whole exome sequencing in conjunction with transcriptome sequencing. The samples were processed and submitted for genomic characterization using pipelines and procedures established within The Cancer Genome Analysis (TCGA) project. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • CoMMpass from the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    The Relating Clinical Outcomes in Multiple Myeloma to Personal Assessment of Genetic Profile study is the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF)’s landmark personalized medicine initiative. CoMMpass is a longitudinal observation study of around 1000 newly diagnosed myeloma patients receiving various standard approved treatments. The MMRF’s vision is to track the treatment and results for each CoMMpass patient so that someday the information can be used to guide decisions for newly diagnosed patients. CoMMpass checked on patients every 6 months for 8 years, collecting tissue samples, genetic, information, quality of life and various disease and clinical outcomes. The study has produced one of the largest genomic and clinical datasets of a single disease. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • Community Partnerships for Older Adults (CPOA) Program Survey of Older Adults, 2002 (USA)

    This survey is one component of the evaluation of the Community Partnerships for Older Adults (CPOA) Program, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation aimed at promoting improvements in the organization and delivery of long-term care and supportive services for older adults through local public-private community partnerships. The survey interviewed a representative sample of older adults aged 50 and over in 13 communities that were awarded development grants by the program. Designed to obtain baseline data about each community's population and to provide information to target the CPOA's activities in the most effective way, the survey interviewed respondents about supportive and long-term care services for older adults in their communities, including the availability, use of, and quality of the services and sources of information about them. Respondents were asked if they expected to stay in their community, if their homes needed repairs or modifications to improve their ability to live in them, how important it was to be able to live in their own home as they grew older, the age at which they thought they would need help to continue living in their own home, and the age at which they thought they could no longer live at home because of health problems. The survey also collected information on health status, problems with activities of everyday life, health insurance coverage and long-term care insurance, hospital stays, living arrangements, social activities, support from family and friends, access to transportation, and demographic characteristics.

    Click here for the dataset
  • COVID-19 Data Lake

    A centralized repository of up-to-date and curated datasets on or related to the spread and characteristics of the novel corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) and its associated illness, COVID-19. Globally, there are several efforts underway to gather this data, and we are working with partners to make this crucial data freely available and keep it up-to-date. Hosted on the AWS cloud, we have seeded our curated data lake with COVID-19 case tracking data from Johns Hopkins and The New York Times, hospital bed availability from Definitive Healthcare, and over 45,000 research articles about COVID-19 and related coronaviruses from the Allen Institute for AI. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • COVID-19 Harmonized Data

    A harmonized collection of the core data pertaining to COVID-19 reported cases by geography, in a format prepared for analysis. New COVID-19 data added twice daily. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • CRELES: Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (Costa Rica Estudio de Longevidad y Envejecimiento Saludable) Series

    The Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES, or "Costa Rica Estudio de Longevidad y Envejecimiento Saludable") is a set of nationally representative longitudinal surveys of health and lifecourse experiences of older Costa Ricans. CRELES was conducted by the University of Costa Rica's Centro Centroamericano de Población and Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud, in collaboration with the University of California at Berkeley.

    Baseline CRELES household interviews were conducted primarily in 2005, with 2-year follow-up interviews in 2007 and 2009. The sample was drawn from Costa Rican residents in the 2000 population census who were born in 1945 or before, with an over-sample of the oldest-old (ages 95 and over). The main study objective was to determine the length and quality of life, and its contributing factors in the elderly of Costa Rica. The series includes data on a broad range of topics including self-reported physical health, psychological health, living conditions, health behaviors, health care utilization, social support, and socioeconomic status. The data also include measured (biomarkers) and observed heath indicators as well as mortality information provided by surviving family members. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • Distributed Archives for Neurophysiology Data Integration (DANDI)

    DANDI is a public archive of neurophysiology datasets, including raw and processed data, and associated software containers. Datasets are shared according to a Creative Commons CC0 or CC-BY licenses. The data archive provides a broad range of cellular neurophysiology data. This includes electrode and optical recordings, and associated imaging data using a set of community standards: NWB:N - NWB:Neurophysiology, BIDS - Brain Imaging Data Structure, and NIDM - Neuro Imaging Data Model. Development of DANDI is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • EFSA Comprehensive European Food Consumption Database

    The Comprehensive Food Consumption Database is a source of information on food consumption across the European Union (EU). It contains detailed data for a number of EU countries. The database plays a key role in the evaluation of the risks related to possible hazards in food in the EU and allows estimates of consumers’ exposure to such hazards, a fundamental step in EFSA’s risk assessment work. The database was also relevant for other fields of EFSA’s work, such as the assessment of nutrient intakes of the EU population. EFSA used its food classification system ‘FoodEx’ to categorise all foods and beverages included in the Comprehensive Database. Summary statistics from the database enable quick screening for chronic and acute exposure to substances and organisms that may be found in the food chain. In the database, dietary surveys and food consumption data for each country are divided by category. These include: age, from infants to adults aged 75 years or older; food group (over 1,500) and type of consumption, covering both regular and high consumption thus allowing calculations to be tailored to each category of consumer. The statistics on food consumption are reported in grams per day (g/day) and grams per day per kg of body weight (g/kg bw per day). The statistics for chronic food consumption are available for the total population (‘all subjects’) and for consumers of respective food categories. The statistics for acute consumption are available for all days and for the consuming days. These food consumption statistics are stored and presented in the EFSA Data Warehouse. 

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  • English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA)

    The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) is a longitudinal study that collects multidisciplinary data from a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and older. The survey data are designed to be used for the investigation of a broad set of topics relevant to understanding the ageing process. Both objective and subjective data are collected covering themes such as: health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy, the determinants of economic position in older age; the links between economic position, physical health, cognition and mental health; the nature and timing of retirement and post-retirement, labour market activity; household and family structure, social networks and social supports; patterns, determinants and consequences of social, civic and cultural participation and predictors of well-being. ELSA is led by Professor Sir Michael Marmot and is jointly run by teams at University College London (UCL), the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), National Centre for Social Research and the University of Manchester.

    Click here for the dataset
  • EU Employment Rate 2014 Ages 20-64

    This dataset shows the employment rate in the EU regions in 2013.

    The 2008 crisis has tended to widen disparities in employment rates and in 2013, rates were 11 percentage points higher in more developed regions than in less developed ones (72% and 61%). Under the Europe 2020 strategy, Member States have set national targets for the employment rate which are broadly consistent with the 75% overall target being achieved by 2020. These vary from 62.9% in Malta to 80% in Denmark and Sweden.

    Click here for the dataset
  • Eurobarometer 2011 European Year of Volunteering

    Before analysing the responses from Europeans, it is necessary to emphasise some important points which can be drawn from this survey. It is very difficult to reach general conclusions because of the different status of the voluntary sector in different Member States. In the absence of Eurostat or other general statistics, the number of Europeans undertaking voluntary work cannot be quantified with any certainty. The contribution of the voluntary sector to the GDP of the EU and its Member States is very difficult to estimate. No EU-wide statistics are available. National data are only available in a few countries. There is a broad consensus that volunteering plays an important role in society, based on the values of solidarity. It contributes to citizenship, especially through the fact that it is well-established at a local level, and is a factor for personal fulfilment and development. 22 to 25% of Europeans are involved in voluntary work Sport and culture: the main areas for voluntary work Solidarity and humanitarian aid: the area in which the voluntary sector plays the most important role Maintaining and strengthening social cohesion, the first benefit of volunteering in the EU Defining an operating framework for the voluntary sector at national or EU level: a divided response. Massive support for the creation of volunteer rescue teams in every region - Encouraging intergenerational solidarity.

    Click here for the dataset
  • Eurobarometer 2012 on perceptions of discrimination in the EU

    The survey examines attitudes and perceptions of Europeans towards discrimination, based on different grounds (gender, ethnic origin, religion or beliefs, age, disability, sexual orientation and gender identity). It also includes several questions on the impact of the crisis on the implementation of anti-discrimination policies and efforts. New questions have been added to cover important or emerging topics, such as the situation of the Roma in Europe, discrimination outside the workplace or the links between discrimination and accessibility. Perceptions on discrimination against transsexual and transgender persons are also explored for the first time.

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  • European Parliament pilot project on health and safety of older workers

    The project “Safer and healthier work at any age – occupational safety and health (OSH) in the context of an ageing workforce”, was initiated and financed by the European Parliament (see Official Journal of the European Communities 29.02.2012, II/230 - II/231) and was carried out by EU-OSHA by delegation from the European Commission. The aim of the European Parliament was to investigate ways of improving health and safety at work considering the challenges of an ageing workforce and to assist policy development in this area. The project carried out by the agency provides a comprehensive overview of issues related to ageing, work, and OSH and an analysis of policies and initiatives addressing the ageing of the workforce across Europe. The project also took account of Eurofound research on sustainable work.

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  • European Quality of Life Survey 2011

    Carried out every four years, this unique, pan-European survey examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general.

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  • Financial Exploitation and Psychological Abuse of Older Adults in the Chicago Metropolitan Area, 2007-2008 [United States]

    The research team developed two self-reporting questionnaires, the Older Adult Mistreatment Assessment (OAMA) Client Questionnaire and the OAMA Staff Questionnaire, in order to measure for financial exploitation and psychological abuse of the elderly. The OAMA Client Questionnaire was administered to clients aged 60 years and over who had been substantiated for at least one form of elderly mistreatment within the Chicago metropolitan area. In addition, a corresponding Staff Questionnaire was administered to each evaluator involved in the field test and submitted on behalf of each client in the study. In all, 227 client interviews with 227 corresponding staff questionnaires were compiled between 2007 and 2008, and scales were developed for measurements of both financial exploitation and psychological abuse. Financial exploitation of the elderly was measured through variables related to theft, scams, coercion, signs of abuse or financial entitlement by trusted friends or family members, and money management difficulties. Psychological abuse of the elderly was measured through variables related to isolation, disrespect, exploited vulnerability, shame, threats and intimidation, and risk factors related to the client's trusted friends or family.

    Click here for the dataset
  • Flash Eurobarometer 247: Family life and the needs of an ageing population

    Opinion on the needs, objectives, expenditures and outcomes of national family policies. Expectations for the future. Role of EU.

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  • Flash Eurobarometer 269: Intergenerational solidarity

    The Flash Eurobarometer Intergenerational solidarity (Flash No 269) was conducted in order to examine EU citizens’ opinions about: existing relations between the younger and older generations costs of an ageing population – particularly in terms of pensions and elderly care the need for pension and social security reforms ways in which older people contribute to society – financially and in a broader way existing possibilities for autonomous living for elderly EU citizens the provision of elderly care and support by social services the role of public authorities in promoting intergenerational solidarity.

    Click here for the dataset
  • Foundation Medicine Adult Cancer Clinical Dataset (FM-AD)

    The Foundation Medicine Adult Cancer Clinical Dataset (FM-AD) is a study conducted by Foundation Medicine Inc (FMI). Genomic profiling data for approximately 18,000 adult patients with a diverse array of cancers was generated using FoundationeOne, FMI's commercially available, comprehensive genomic profiling assay. This dataset contains open Clinical and Biospecimen data. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • Global Database of Events, Language and Tone (GDELT)

    This project monitors the world's broadcast, print, and web news from nearly every corner of every country in over 100 languages and identifies the people, locations, organizations, counts, themes, sources, emotions, quotes, images and events driving our global society every second of every day. More information

    Click here for the dataset
  • Google Trends

    Find information on search terms or search volume reaching back to 2004. Data can be downloaded so you can explore it on your desktop. The page gives you some examples of things you could search for and also lists top search terms on the landing page. Aging & Geriatrics is one of the available search terms, and you can also filter by image search, news search, YouTube search etc. and by geographical region and timeframe and the engine will give you hints on related topics and queries.

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  • Health and Retirement Study (HRS)

    The University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. Supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA U01AG009740) and the Social Security Administration, the HRS explores the changes in labor force participation and the health transitions that individuals undergo toward the end of their work lives and in the years that follow. Since its launch in 1992, the study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, and health care expenditures. Through its unique and in-depth interviews, the HRS provides an invaluable and growing body of multidisciplinary data that researchers can use to address important questions about the challenges and opportunities of aging. More information

    HRS sister studies in other countries available through RAND Survey Meta Data Repository. The Survey Meta Data Repository is a collection of HRS-family survey data. It includes a digital library of survey questions, a search engine for finding comparable questions across the surveys, and a set of identically defined variables for cross-country analysis.

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  • Human Development Report 2015: Countries ranked by human development, gender inequality and poverty

    The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, access to knowledge, and a decent standard of living. The HDI is the geometric mean of normalized indices for each of the three dimensions. The health dimension is assessed by life expectancy at birth, the education dimension is measured by mean of years of education for adults aged 25 years and more and expected years of education for children, and the standard of living dimension is measured by gross national income per capita. The Inequality-Adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) adjusts the HDI for inequality in the distribution of each dimension across the population. The Gender Development Index (GDI) measures gender inequalities in achievement in three basic dimensions of human development: health, measured by female and male life expectancy at birth; education, measured by female and male expected years of education for children and female and male mean years of education for adults ages 25 and older; and command over economic resources, measured by female and male estimated earned income. The Gender Inequality Index (GII) reflects gender-based disadvantage in three dimensions—reproductive health, empowerment, and the labour market—for as many countries as data of reasonable quality allow. It shows the loss in potential human development due to inequality between female and male achievements in these dimensions. The Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) identifies multiple deprivations at the household level in education, health, and standard of living as indicators of poverty. It uses micro data from household surveys, and — unlike the IHDI — all the indicators needed to construct the measure must come from the same survey.

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  • Human Connectome Project

    The Human Connectome Project aims to provide an unparalleled compilation of neural data, an interface to graphically navigate this data and the opportunity to achieve never before realized conclusions about the living human brain. More information

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  • IGEMS: The Consortium on Interplay of Genes and Environment Across Multiple Studies

    The Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) group is a consortium of eight longitudinal twin studies established to explore the nature of social context effects and gene-environment interplay in late-life functioning. The resulting analysis of the combined data from over 17,500 participants aged 25–102 at baseline (including nearly 2,600 monogygotic and 4,300 dizygotic twin pairs and over 1,700 family members) aims to understand why early life adversity, and social factors such as isolation and loneliness, are associated with diverse outcomes including mortality, physical functioning (health, functional ability), and psychological functioning (well-being, cognition), particularly in later life.

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  • Integrative Analysis of Longitudinal Studies on Aging (IALSA)

    The IALSA research network is a collaborative research infrastructure for coordinated interdisciplinary, cross-national research aimed at the integrative understanding of within-person aging-related changes in health and cognition. The (IALSA) network is currently comprised of over 25 longitudinal studies on aging, spanning eight countries, with a combined sample size of approximately 70,000 individuals. These studies represent a mix of population representative, volunteer, and special population samples. Within the network, data have been collected on individuals aged 18 to over 100, with birth cohorts ranging from 1880 to 1980, and historical periods from 1956 to the present. Between-occasion intervals range from 6 months to 17 years (the majority 1-5 years), with between 2 and 32 (mainly 3-5) measurement occasions spanning 4 to 48 years of within-person assessment.

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  • International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH)

    INDEPTH is a global network of HDSSs. Its 41 member centres observe the life events of millions of people in 20 LMICs in Africa, Asia and Oceania. Since its inception in 1998, the network has gathered a treasure trove of robust data and is uniquely positioned both to answer the most pressing questions on health, population dynamics and development, and to provide policymakers and donors with evidence on the impact of interventions. This network of health and demographic surveillance systems (HDSSs) collects data from whole communities over extended time periods that reflect health and population problems in LMICs. By monitoring new health threats, tracking population changes through fertility rates, death rates and migration, and measuring the effect of policy interventions on communities, HDSSs provide information that enables policymakers to make informed decisions and to adapt their programs to changing conditions.

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  • International Neuroimaging Data-Sharing Initiative (INDI)

    This bucket contains multiple neuroimaging datasets that are part of the International Neuroimaging Data-Sharing Initiative. Raw human and non-human primate neuroimaging data include 1) Structural MRI; 2) Functional MRI; 3) Diffusion Tensor Imaging; 4) Electroencephalogram (EEG) In addition to the raw data, preprocessed data is also included for some datasets. More information

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  • Irish LongituDinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)

    The Irish LongituDinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) is a study of a representative cohort of over 8500 people resident in Ireland aged 50+, charting their health, social and economic circumstances over a 10-year period. The second wave of data collection was completed this year. TILDA is unique amongst longitudinal studies internationally in the breadth of physical, mental health and cognitive measures collected. More information

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  • Japanese-American Research Project (JARP): a Three-Generation Study, 1890-1966

    This data collection is a sociohistorical study of the ways in which three generations (Issei, Nisei, and Sansei) of Japanese American families adapted to social, cultural, educational, occupational, and other institutions of American life. The study examines the experience of the first immigrants to the United States (Issei), and their children (Nisei) and grandchildren (Sansei). Interviews with Issei families stressed the difficulties faced by the immigrants during their early years in the United States, as well as aspects of social and cultural life. Interviews with Nisei included questions on employment, attitudes toward work, income, education, marriage, social relationships, discrimination, and religion. Topics covered in Sansei interviews included birth order, age, marital status, children, social relationships, occupation, industry, income, education, Japanese value systems, marital choices, influence of parents and grandparents, discrimination, religion, political attitudes, and migration. More information

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  • Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement (JSTAR)

    In order to establish a sustainable social security system in Japan, whose population is aging ahead of other developed countries, it is crucial to make available micro-data on the diverse aspects of the lives of elderly people. Extensive surveys have been conducted on elderly people in many other countries, and the resulting data have been utilized not only for academic and research purposes, but also as a valuable input for real-world policymaking. Despite the rapid aging of the Japanese population, no statistical survey that could properly capture the diversity of the elderly population from various viewpoints had been carried out in Japan until recently.

    Against this backdrop, RIETI and Hitotsubashi University jointly launched a comprehensive survey of elderly people in 2007 to collect panel data on their lives and health, with the University of Tokyo joining from 2009 onward. The data collected in this survey include diverse information on the economic, social, and health conditions of elderly people. In addition, the survey is designed to ensure, to the maximum extent possible, comparability with preceding surveys such as the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) in the United States, the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) in continental Europe, and the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA) in the United Kingdom. Therefore, by analyzing JSTAR data, researchers can track the characteristics of the Japanese elderly population in terms of both their specificity and universality in the world. In this sense, JSTAR is Japan's first-ever globally comparable panel data survey of elderly people.

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  • Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)

    Korea became an ageing society in 2000, as the proportion of those 65 or older reached 7% of the population. Lacking in basic data on ageing, Korea is in need of a structured set of statistical data. Institutional reform and policy-making in preparation against the aged society requires systematic build-up of data that can track individuals' labor participation, income and asset status, spending patterns, retirement decisions, impact of social welfare, health, and intra-family transfer of income, among others. The purpose of KLoSA is to create the basic data needed to devise and implement effective social, economic policies to address the trends that emerge in the process of population ageing. The data will help identify and observe different dimensions of an aged society, build datasets that enable studies in different fields, and generate data comparable with similar panel studies in other countries (eg. U.S., Europe) that can provide the basis for policy-making and academic studies.

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  • Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI)

    Data are lacking on the health, social support, and economic security of India’s growing elderly population, and concern is mounting about the well-being of this expanding group. By assembling a research team of demographers, economists, medical doctors, sociologists, and public health and policy experts, LASI aims to supply the data needed to take stock of the situation of India’s elderly population. It is hoped that this evidence base will contribute to cross-national studies of aging and will inform the design of policies that can protect and support the growing elderly community.

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  • Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS)

    The Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) started as a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. The MHAS study will design, field, and disseminate the data to achieve research goals that include: examining the aging processes and its disease and disability burden in a large representative panel of older Mexicans; evaluating the effects of individual behaviors, early life circumstances, migration and economic history, community characteristics, and family transfer systems on multiple health outcomes; comparing the health dynamics of older Mexicans with comparably aged Mexican-born migrants in the U.S. and second generation Mexican-American using similar data from the U.S. population (for example the biennial Health and Retirement Study HRS) to assess the durability of the migrant health advantage; assess the health of all components of the population from which migrants are selectively recruited; and considering ways in which intergenerational transfer systems affect old-age health dynamics in a country where migration is commonplace and remittances may repay prior investments or ensure against uncertainty in old age.

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  • Midlife in the United States (MIDUS)

    MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) is a national sample of continental U.S. residents, aged 25 to 74, who were first interviewed in 1995-96. The original study was conceived by a multidisciplinary team of investigators interested in the influence of psychological and social factors on health, broadly defined, as people age from early adulthood to later life. MIDUS is a collaborative, interdisciplinary investigation of patterns, predictors, and consequences of midlife development in the areas of physical health, psychological well-being, and social responsibility. The scientific scope of the study was extended by adding comprehensive biological assessments on a subsample of respondents. In its longitudinal extension, MIDUS thus became a forum for investigating health as an integrative process, which involved combining the behavioral and social sciences together with bio-medically oriented research. More information

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  • MIMIC-III (Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care)

    MIMIC-III (‘Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care’) is a large, single-center database comprising information relating to patients admitted to critical care units at a large tertiary care hospital. Data includes vital signs, medications, laboratory measurements, observations and notes charted by care providers, fluid balance, procedure codes, diagnostic codes, imaging reports, hospital length of stay, survival data, and more. The database supports applications including academic and industrial research, quality improvement initiatives, and higher education coursework. The MIMIC-III dataset is freely-available. Researchers seeking to use the database must formally request access. For details, see the getting started page. Once you have a PhysioNet account, you must enable acccess to the MIMIC-III dataset from your AWS account. To do this, please input your AWS account number, and request access to the MIMIC-III Clinical Database on AWS. More information

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  • MRI and Alzheimer’s: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Comparisons of Demented and Nondemented Adults

    Cross-sectional MRI Data in Young, Middle Aged, Nondemented and Demented Older Adults: This set consists of a cross-sectional collection of 416 subjects aged 18 to 96. For each subject, 3 or 4 individual T1-weighted MRI scans obtained in single scan sessions are included. The subjects are all right-handed and include both men and women. 100 of the included subjects over the age of 60 have been clinically diagnosed with very mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Additionally, a reliability data set is included containing 20 nondemented subjects imaged on a subsequent visit within 90 days of their initial session. Longitudinal MRI Data in Nondemented and Demented Older Adults: This set consists of a longitudinal collection of 150 subjects aged 60 to 96. Each subject was scanned on two or more visits, separated by at least one year for a total of 373 imaging sessions. For each subject, 3 or 4 individual T1-weighted MRI scans obtained in single scan sessions are included. The subjects are all right-handed and include both men and women. 72 of the subjects were characterized as nondemented throughout the study. 64 of the included subjects were characterized as demented at the time of their initial visits and remained so for subsequent scans, including 51 individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. Another 14 subjects were characterized as nondemented at the time of their initial visit and were subsequently characterized as demented at a later visit.

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  • National Cancer Institute Centre for Cancer Research – Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Genomics and Expression

    The study describes integrative analysis of genetic lesions in 574 diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) involving exome and transcriptome sequencing, array-based DNA copy number analysis and targeted amplicon resequencing. The dataset contains open RNA-Seq Gene Expression Quantification data. More information

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  • National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS)

    The National Long Term Care Survey is a longitudinal survey designed to study changes in the health and functional status of older Americans (aged 65+). It also tracks health expenditures, Medicare service use, and the availability of personal, family, and community resources for caregiving. The NLTCS survey population consists of a sample of 35,789 people drawn from national Medicare enrollment files in 1982 that has been augmented with subsequent samples of approximately 20,000 Medicare enrollees obtained by adding 5,000 people passing age 65 between successive surveys done approximately every five years. This technique ensures a large, nationally-representative sample at each point in time. Both elderly in the community (including those not impaired) and those residing in institutions are represented in the samples. The survey is administered by the U.S. Census Bureau using trained interviewers, and the response rate is above 95 percent for all waves.

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  • National Long-Term Care Survey (NLTCS): 1982, 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, and 2004

    The NLTCS was designed to measure disability and the use of long-term care (LTC) among the U.S. elderly (age 65+) population at multiple points in time from 1982 to 2004. The cumulative sample size over the six survey years (waves) was 49,258 distinct persons, all of whom were enrolled in the Medicare program. The NLTCS is a nationally-representative sample that includes both community and institutionalized populations. It is also longitudinal as the sample individuals joined the survey once they reach 65 years of age (except for 1982 where ages above 65 were represented) and remained in the survey until they either died or were lost to follow-up. More information

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  • National Survey of Black Americans, Waves 1-4, 1979-1980, 1987-1988, 1988-1989, 1992

    The purpose of this data collection was to provide an appropriate theoretical and empirical approach to concepts, measures, and methods in the study of Black Americans. Developed with input from social scientists, students, and a national advisory panel of Black scholars, the survey investigates neighborhood-community integration, services, crime and community contact, the role of religion and the church, physical and mental health, self-esteem, life satisfaction, employment, the effects of chronic unemployment, the effects of race on the job, interaction with family and friends, racial attitudes, race identity, group stereotypes, and race ideology. Demographic variables include education, marital status, income, employment status, occupation, and political behavior and affiliation. More information

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  • Nhanes Survey (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey)

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The survey is unique in that it combines interviews and physical examinations. NHANES is a major program of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). NCHS is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and has the responsibility for producing vital and health statistics for the Nation. The NHANES interview includes demographic, socioeconomic, dietary, and health-related questions. The examination component consists of medical, dental, and physiological measurements, as well as laboratory tests administered by highly trained medical personnel. The diseases, medical conditions, and health indicators to be studied include: Anemia, Cardiovascular disease, Diabetes, Environmental exposures, Eye diseases, Hearing loss, Infectious diseases, Kidney disease, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Osteoporosis, Physical fitness and physical functioning, Reproductive history and sexual behavior, Respiratory disease (asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema), Sexually transmitted diseases, Vision. 10000 individuals are surveyed to represent US statistics.

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  • NIH Human Microbiome Project

    Characterization of the microbiomes of healthy human subjects at five major body sites. More information

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  • NYU Langone & FAIR FastMRI Dataset

    This dataset contains deidentified raw k-space data and DICOM image files of over 1,500 knees and 6,970 brains. More information

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  • Older Adult Housing Directory (Waterloo, Canada)

    Points that represent the locations of housing geared to older adults in Waterloo, including independent living, assistive & supportive living, and long-term care homes. Where a property contains more than one level of care, multiple points are placed at the same location.

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  • OpenNeuro

    OpenNeuro is a database of openly-available brain imaging data. The data are shared according to a Creative Commons CC0 license, providing a broad range of brain imaging data to researchers and citizen scientists alike. The database primarily focuses on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, but also includes other imaging modalities including structural and diffusion MRI, electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalograpy (MEG). OpenfMRI is a project of the Center for Reproducible Neuroscience at Stanford University. Development of the OpenNeuro resource has been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. More information

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  • Oregon Health & Science University Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia Dataset

    The OHSU-CNL study offers the whole exome and RNA-sequencing on a cohort of 100 cases with rare hematologic malignancies such as Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL), atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), and unclassified myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN-U). This dataset contains open RNA-Seq Gene Expression Quantification data. More information

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  • Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

    The Panel Study of Income Dynamics - PSID - is the longest running longitudinal household survey in the world. The study began in 1968 with a nationally representative sample of over 18,000 individuals living in 5,000 families in the United States. Information on these individuals and their descendants has been collected continuously, including data covering employment, income, wealth, expenditures, health, marriage, childbearing, child development, philanthropy, education, and numerous other topics. The PSID is directed by faculty at the University of Michigan, and the data are available on this website without cost to researchers and analysts.

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  • Project Talent

    Project Talent is a national longitudinal study that first surveyed America’s high school students in 1960. At the time, it was the largest and most comprehensive study of high school students ever conducted in the United States. Over 440,000 students from 1,353 schools across the country participated in two full days or four half days of testing. The study was developed by the American Institutes for Research, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research institute, and several other organizations, including the University of Pittsburgh, through a Cooperative Agreement. It was funded by the United States Office of Education. Fifty years later, the American Institutes for Research is planning to follow up with participants from the original 1960 study.

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  • Prevalence of drug use in Europe (EMCDDA 2018 Statistical Bulletin)

    Prevalence and patterns of drug use in the general population (adults or school children) is assessed through surveys based on representative probabilistic samples of the whole population under study. Interview surveys are based on self-report of participants regarding present and past behaviours, personal characteristics, knowledge and attitudes regarding drugs or other health topics.

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  • Prevalence of drug use in Europe (EMCDDA 2019 Statistical Bulletin)

    Prevalence and patterns of drug use in the general population (adults or school children) is assessed through surveys based on representative probabilistic samples of the whole population under study. Interview surveys are based on self-report of participants regarding present and past behaviours, personal characteristics, knowledge and attitudes regarding drugs or other health topics.

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  • Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE): A Cross-National Study

    The RELATE study compiles cross-national data that contain information that can be used to examine the effects of early life conditions on older adult health conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, obesity, functionality, mortality, and self-reported health. The complete cross sectional/longitudinal dataset (n=147,278) was compiled from major studies of older adults or households across the world that in most instances are representative of the older adult population either nationally, in major urban centers, or in provinces. It includes over 180 variables with information on demographic and geographic variables along with information about early life conditions and life course events for older adults in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Selected variables were harmonized to facilitate cross national comparisons. In this first public release of the RELATE data, a subset of the data (n=88,273) is being released. The subset includes harmonized data of older adults from the following regions of the world: Africa (Ghana and South Africa), Asia (China, India), Latin America (Costa Rica, major cities in Latin America), and the United States (Puerto Rico, Wisconsin). This first release of the data collection is composed of 19 downloadable parts: Part 1 includes the harmonized cross-national RELATE dataset, which harmonizes data from parts 2 through 19. Specifically, parts 2 through 19 include data from Costa Rica (Part 2), Puerto Rico (Part 3), the United States (Wisconsin) (Part 4), Argentina (Part 5), Barbados (Part 6), Brazil (Part 7), Chile (Part 8), Cuba (Part 9), Mexico (Parts 10 and 15), Uruguay (Part 11), China (Parts 12, 18, and 19), Ghana (Part 13), India (Part 14), Russia (Part 16), and South Africa (Part 17). More information

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  • Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Careiver Health (REACH)

    The REACH study was a multisite caregiver intervention study that compared a variety of interventions for dementia caregivers to control conditions. The study was a landmark in its large sample size, use of multiple sites, and inclusion of large numbers of White, Hispanic, and African American caregivers.

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  • SHARE Israel

    The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a multidisciplinary and cross-national panel database of micro data on health, socio-economic status and social and family networks of more than 55,000 individuals from 20 European countries aged 50 or over. Israel joined SHARE in 2004. The first wave of data collection was conducted in Israel between October 2005 and July 2006, among 1771 Israeli households. A total of 2598 men and women were interviewed face-to-face. The second wave of data collection started in August 2009 and ended in August 2010, making longitudinal data available.

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  • Smithsonian Open Access

    The Smithsonian’s mission is the "increase and diffusion of knowledge" and has been collecting since 1846. The Smithsonian, through its efforts to digitize its multidisciplinary collections, has created millions of digital assets and related metadata describing the collection objects. On February 25th, 2020, the Smithsonian released over 2.8 million CC0 interdisciplinary 2-D and 3-D images, related metadata, and additionally, research data from researches across the Smithsonian. The 2.8 million "open access" collections are a subset of the Smithsonian’s 155 million objects, 2.1 million library volumes and 156,000 cubic feet of archival collections held in 19 museums, 9 research centers, libraries, archives and the National Zoo. Digitization of collections is ongoing. More information

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  • Special Eurobarometer 129: Europeans the elderly

    A Comparison of the 1992 and 1999 Eurobarometer Surveys by: ALAN WALKER Professor of Social Policy University of Sheffield Sheffield S10 2TU UK DEMOGRAPHIC CONTEXT One of the major successes of the second half of the twentieth century has been increasing longevity, reflecting the improved conditions of health and welfare standards of the population within the EU. Increasing life expectancy is an indicator of social and economic development; the triumph of science and public policy over many of the causes of premature death which truncated lives in earlier times. Europe can be justly proud of the fact that, in the last 50 years, its model of development has allowed increasing numbers of citizens to reach advanced old age and to do so in relative economic security. However, extended longevity coupled with an important decline in fertility over the last 30 years, has resulted in a fast transition towards a much older population that, according to demographic projections, will last for several decades. The trend towards population ageing is bringing about profound changes for all generations and most areas of economic and social activity. As Europe enters the twenty-first century, the demographic trend towards an ageing society is becoming a highly important issue for social protection, the labour market, politics, design and technology, education and culture, in short for the whole economy and all of society. 

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  • Special Eurobarometer 141: The Information Society

    A Eurobarometer survey carried out for the European Commission by INRA (Europe) - European Coordination Office in Spring 2000. This report is structured in five parts. The first section looks at the ownership and use of various information and communication technologies. The second focuses on the interest raised by these technologies and intentions to purchase them. The last three sections investigate the use of the Internet (applications and services, impact on other activities and connection). The social-demographic variables used in this report are: 1) Country 2) Gender 3) Age (in four bands: 15-24, 25-39, 40-54 and 55 years or more) 4) Professional status (in three groups: Self-employed, Employed and Not working) 5) Household income (harmonised in four bands) 6) Size of household (number of people living in household) 7) Level of education (Terminal Education Age, i.e. age when finished full time education, in four bands: age of 15 or less, 16-19, 20 years or more, still studying) 8) Media use index (aggregate of three questions regarding exposure to news media – radio, television and newspapers-, in four groups) When possible and appropriate, relevant variables are considered for cross-tabulation with various social-demographic variables so as to determine the amplitude, if any, of inter-group differences. This report was prepared by François Heinderyckx, PhD, lecturer at the University of Brussels (ULB), Chairman of the department of Communication, information and journalism.

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  • Special Eurobarometer 168: Discrimination in Europe

    This Eurobarometer survey on discrimination was commissioned to find out more about people's attitudes towards discrimination. Women and men in all fifteen member countries were asked about discrimination they may have experienced or seen at work, in education, in seeking housing or as a customer of retail or other services. They were also asked about their attitudes towards discrimination. The questionnaire included questions on people's perceptions of discrimination on the five grounds covered by the Community Action Programme against Discrimination: racial or ethnic origin, religion or beliefs, disability (physical disability, learning difficulties or mental illness) age and sexual orientation.

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  • Special Eurobarometer 183.7: Health of adults

    This public opinion survey was carried out at the request of the Directorate-General Health and Consumer Protection and was managed and organised by the Public Opinion Analysis Sector of the Directorate-General Press and Communication. It was conducted in all the Member at States of the European Union between October 28 and December 8, 2002, under the general coordination of the European Opinion Research Group EEIG in Brussels. The vast majority (67.8%) of EU citizens aged 15 years and over considered themselves to be healthy, only 5.7% perceiving themselves to be in bad or worse health. A quarter (25.3%) reported chronic morbidity and a quarter (26.3%) had activity restriction with 6.2% severely restricted. Low levels of sensory functional limitation were reported (1.3% near vision, 3.4% far vision and 3.0% in hearing), though without the use of aids 42.1% were limited in near vision, 21.1% in far vision and 4.5% in hearing. Physical functional limitations were more common with 3.6% limited in walking 500 metres even with an aid, 9.6% in climbing stairs and 10.5% in lifting 5 kilos.

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  • Special Eurobarometer 185: Lifelong learning: citizens' views

    This is the first Eurobarometer survey that asks citizens for their views in a detailed way. Its interesting findings confirm the political goals set at the European Council Summit in Lisbon and they reinforce the importance of the work that is being done at European level on lifelong learning and e-learning. The survey covers residents of all Member States as well as Iceland and Norway, with the relevant country nationality and aged 15 years and over. A new sample is drawn for each Eurobarometer survey. It is representative of the population aged 15+ in terms of gender, age, NUTS2 region and urbanisation size. The average number of people interviewed in each country was 1 000, except in Germany (2 144 interviews), the United Kingdom (1 439), Luxembourg (615) and Iceland (628). Altogether, 18 227 interviews were conducted, including 16 567 in the European Union. All interviews were carried out face to face (18) in people’s homes and in the appropriate national language. Up to four recalls were made. The 15 main questions were worded in a format specific to Eurobarometer surveys. Two types of questions were used: multiple-choice questions, where the respondent is asked to give one or up to three answers depending on the question; and a list of items for which interviewees are asked to respond to each. In all cases, respondents can reply that they have no idea (coded as ‘don’t know’). 

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  • Special Eurobarometer 256: Consumer rights and consumer organisations (Wave 2) in Slovakia, in Slovenia, in Czech Republic

    In the period from 13 to 29 June 2006 the second wave of the research , in survey on consumer rights issues was conducted in Slovakia, in Slovenia, in Czech Republic. This survey was carried out using a representative sample of 1143 citizens of the Slovak Republic, aged 15 years or older, who answered questions on the following themes: - Survey on awareness and evaluation of the consumers’ rights campaign - Consumer rights in the media - Awareness and use of services provided by consumer protection organisations - Awareness of consumer rights The objective of the present study was to measure the initial impact of a European Union consumer rights information campaign, which began in Slovakia in May 2006 and will run until the end of the year.

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  • Special Eurobarometer 261: European Employment and Social Policy

    In order to get a better idea of how much people know about EU employment and social policy and what they think of it, the European Commission's Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities commissioned this Eurobarometer study, which was carried out by TNS Opinion & Social using a representative sample of 24,815 people aged 15 or older in the 25 Member States,two pre-accession countries (Bulgaria and Romania) and two candidate countries (Croatia and Turkey). The study assessed how European citizens perceive the European Union's role in employment and social affairs, and how aware they are of EU instruments such as the European Social Fund. It also looked at the level of public approval for measures promoting the concept of 'flexicurity' – a policy approach which combines more flexible labour markets with high levels of employment security and social protection. This approach is currently a key issue in EU policy debates. The survey also looked at the employment situation of European citizens and their own vision of the future – in other words, their personal expectations of finding a job, or keeping the one they have, in the near future. Finally, the study focused on the strategies and tools promoted by the European Employment Strategy and the ESF, and looked at whether European citizens considered them important for finding, or keeping, a job. Particular attention was paid to training, and its impact on people's integration into the labour market and how well they adapt to a changing working environment.

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  • Special Eurobarometer 263: Discrimination in the European Union

    In this summary we present the findings from a survey about discrimination and inequality in Europe that was carried out by TNS Opinion & Social on behalf of the European Commission DG Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities in the twenty-five Member States of the European Union and in the two acceding countries between 7 June and 12 July 2006. In this summary the six legally prohibited forms of discrimination in the EU are examined: discrimination on the basis of sex, ethnic origin, religion or beliefs, age, disability and sexual orientation. Abbreviations used in this summary correspond to: EU25 European Union - 25 Member States at the time of the survey and prior to the accession of Bulgaria and Romania EU15 European Union - 15 Member States before the most recent enlargement (1st May 2004) DK Don’t know Readers are reminded that survey results are estimations, the accuracy of which rests upon the sample size and upon the observed percentages.

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  • Special Eurobarometer 279: Poverty and exclusion

    The Directorate-General Employment of the European Commission commissioned a survey that examines public opinion about poverty and exclusion in the European Union. Between the 14th of February and the 18th of March 2007, TNS Opinion & Social, a consortium formed by TNS and EOS Gallup Europe interviewed 26,466 EU citizens aged 15 and over living in the 27 European Union Member States and 1,000 residents of Croatia. This report studies the following issues related to poverty and exclusion covered by the survey. First of all, we focus on the perceived existence of poverty in the European Union: to what extent are Europeans themselves affected by poverty and to what extent do they see poverty in the area in which they live? In this chapter we furthermore look at attitudes towards poverty: is it an inherited or acquired condition, what causes poverty and why do people live in need? The second part of the report focuses on one of the most extreme forms of exclusion, homelessness: why do people become homeless, what is the perceived risk of becoming homeless oneself and what do Europeans do to help homeless people? In the final part we examine what Europeans regard necessary in order to have a decent standard of living with regards to financial means, housing needs, ownership of durable goods, basic necessities and social integration. We also look specifically at people’s views concerning the requirements and the needs of children to live and develop well. We end the report with an examination of how people’s attitudes towards poverty relate to what they consider necessary for a decent standard of living.

    Click here for the dataset

  • Special Eurobarometer 296: Discrimination in the European Union: Perceptions, Experiences and Attitudes

    In anticipation of this Year of Equal Opportunities for All, the European Commission DG Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunity Opportunities commissioned a survey about discrimination and inequality in Europe, conducted in the summer of 2006. This current report represents a follow-up to this survey, tracking how perceptions and opinion in this field have changed in the intervening year. Several new questions are also asked in the current survey, for example dealing with the subject of 'multiple discrimination'. Both surveys were carried out by TNS Opinion & Social network – this current one between February 18th and March 22nd, 2008. In the report the six legally prohibited forms of discrimination in the EU are examined: discrimination on the basis of gender, ethnic origin, religion or beliefs, age, disability and sexual orientation.

    Click here for the dataset

  • Special Eurobarometer 316: European Employment and Social Policy

    To measure the impact of the economic crisis on Europeans' jobs and employment prospects, the European Commission's Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities commissioned this Eurobarometer study, which was carried out by TNS Opinion & Social using a representative sample of 26,756 people aged 15 or older in the 27 European Union Member States as well as the three candidate countries (Croatia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Turkey).

    Click here for the data

     

  • Special Eurobaroeter 317: Discrimination in the EU in 2009

    The European anti-discrimination legislation is one of the most extensive in the world. Even so, 16% of Europeans reported experiencing discrimination in 2009, with age being the most common reason. However, it is discrimination based on ethnic origin which is most widely perceived. The economic crisis has lowered confidence that governments will promote equality, and increased the belief that discrimination will rise. However, Europeans increasingly believe that enough is being done to combat discrimination. Despite this, only a third know their rights concerning discrimination or harassment. In the report the six legally prohibited grounds of discrimination in the EU are examined: 1. Gender 2. Ethnic origin 3. Religion or beliefs 4. Age 5. Disability 6. Sexual orientation.

    Click here for the dataset

     

  • Special Eurobarometer 378: Active Ageing

    The Eurobarometer survey on Active Ageing has been commissioned by the European Commission 's Directorate General for the Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion to understand citizens' views and attitudes towards older people, the contribution of older people in the workplace and society, and how to best promote an active role of older people in society. The main themes addressed in this report are: - Overall perceptions of age and older people – perceptions of and attitudes towards older people, the potential role for older people in society and the impact of the ageing population in the future - Older people in the workplace – attitudes towards older people in the workplace and potential barriers to continuing work - Retirement and pensions – attitudes towards the official retirement age and pension payments and whether any changes are appropriate - Voluntary work and support for older people – establishing the level of personal participation in voluntary work and care of older people - Age friendly environment – identifying the countries/areas best adapted to the needs of older people and how improvements can be made in those most poorly adapted.

    Click here for the dataset

  • Special Eurobarometer 393: Discimination in the EU in 2012

    This survey looks into attitudes and perceptions of Europeans towards discrimination, based on different grounds (gender, ethnic origin, religion or beliefs, age, disability, sexual orientation and gender identity). As the last Eurobarometer on this topic, from 2009, this survey also includes several questions on the impact of the crisis on the implementation of anti-discrimination policies and efforts. New questions have been added to cover important or emerging topics, such as the situation of the Roma in Europe, discrimination outside the workplace or the links between discrimination and accessibility. Perceptions on discrimination against transsexual and transgender persons are also explored for the first time. The report examines the following grounds of discrimination: 1. Gender 2. Ethnic origin 3. Religion or beliefs 4. Age (divided into two subcategories: age over 55 and age under 30) 5. Disability 6. Sexual orientation 7. Gender identity (being transsexual or transgender) The report is structured as follows: - Setting the context, including whether citizens think of themselves as belonging to a minority group and the diversity of their social circles; - Perceptions of discrimination covering attitudes to different groups and the perceived extent of discrimination in Europe in general and outside working life; - A detailed analysis of discrimination on individual grounds; - Measurements of discrimination in Europe, whether directly experienced by Europeans or as third-party evidence; - Knowledge of one’s rights as a potential victim of discrimination; - Assessments of national efforts made to combat discrimination and the impact of the economic crisis on equality policies; - Views on equal opportunities in employment, including an examination of the effect of the economic crisis on the perceived extent of discrimination; - The case of the Roma.

    Click here for the date set

  • Special Eurobarometer 437: Discrimination in the EU in 2015

    As the last Eurobarometer on this topic in 2012, the survey looks into attitudes and perceptions of Europeans towards discrimination based on different grounds (gender, ethnic origin, religion or beliefs, age, disability, sexual orientation and gender identity) and citizens' opinions on different policy measures to combat discrimination. For the first time the survey explores the social acceptance of specific groups belonging to ethnic and religious minorities. Also for the first the survey is looking into social acceptance and citizens' views on the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons.

    Click here for the dataset
  • Special Eurobarometer 471: Fairness, inequality and inter-generational mobility

    Rising perceptions of unfairness, coupled with political, social and economic challenges, can undermine the solidarity, cohesion and mutual understanding that are necessary for the EU to function effectively in the interest of its citizens. In this context, the European Commission has conducted a Special Eurobarometer to better understand citizens' views on fairness and inequality and factors influencing their perceptions. It also provides information on Europeans' inter-generational social mobility. This Special Eurobarometer shows that European Union citizens believe that what happens in their life and the decisions concerning them are fair. At an individual level, Europeans generally perceive life as just. Yet, such feelings change substantially when fairness is assessed at country level and when specific aspects of life are concerned.

    Click here for the dataset 

  • Special Eurobarometer 493: Discriminationin the EU (including LGBTI)

    The survey focusses on person’s perceptions, attitudes and opinions of discrimination based on ethnic origin, skin colour, sexual orientation, gender, age, disability, religion, and beliefs. It shows that, compared to 2015, fewer EU citizens now perceive discrimination as being widespread in their country. However, perceptions, opinions and attitudes still vary widely depending on the group discriminated against and also from country to country. 

    Click here for the dataset

  • Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Series

    SWAN is a multi-site, longitudinal, epidemiological study designed to examine the health of women during their middle years. The study examines the physical, biological, psychological and social changes during this transitional period. The goal of SWAN's research is to help scientists, health care providers and women learn how mid-life experiences affect health and quality of life during aging. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)

    The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a research infrastructure for studying the effects of health, social, economic and environmental policies over the life-course of European citizens and beyond. From 2004 until today, 380,000 in-depth interviews with 140,000 people aged 50 or older from 28 European countries and Israel have been conducted. Thus, SHARE is the largest pan-European social science panel study providing internationally comparable longitudinal micro data which allow insights in the fields of public health and socio-economic living conditions of European individuals. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • Swedish Adoption/Twin Study on Aging (SATSA)

    The Swedish Adoption/Twin Study on Aging (SATSA) was designed to study the origins of individual differences in aging and the environmental and genetic factors that are involved. SATSA began in 1984, and six additional waves were conducted in 1987, 1990, 1993, 2004, 2007, and 2010. The questionnaire was initially sent to all twins from the Swedish Twin Registry who were separated at an early age and raised apart; the survey was also administered to a control sample of twins who were raised together. More information

    Click here for the data set

  • Technology Tracker UK 2018

    This research measures awareness, access, use of and attitudes towards fixed and mobile telecoms, internet, multi-channel TV, and radio, among UK adults (aged 16+). Across the UK overall, and within each UK nation, the Technology Tracker provides detailed analysis by key population demographics, sub-region, and by urban vs. rural. It collects data that enable comparisons to be made with older data collected by Ofcom, informing Ofcom analysis, reports and decisions. More information

    Click here for the dataset 

  • US Census ACS PUMS

    U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) available in a linked data format using the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model. More information

    Click here for the dataset

  • Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging

    The Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging (VETSA) is a large-scale investigation of cognitive aging from middle to later age. The intended sample was recruited from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry (VETR), a registry of middle-aged male-male twin pairs who both served in the United States military during the Vietnam conflict (1965-1975). VETSA employs a multitrait, multimethod approach to cognitive assessment to focus on the genetic and environmental contributions to cognitive processes over time, as well as the relative contributions to cognitive aging from health, social, personality, and other contextual factors.

    Click here for the dataset

  • Violence against Women: An EU-wide survey

    The FRA survey on violence against women is based on face-to-face interviews with 42,000 women across the EU. The survey was carried out between March and September 2012 and presents the most comprehensive survey worldwide on women’s experiences of violence. The survey asked women about their experiences of physical, sexual and psychological violence, including domestic violence, since the age of 15 and over the 12 months before the interview. Questions were also asked about incidents of stalking, sexual harassment, and the role played by new technologies in women’s experiences of abuse. In addition, the survey asked about respondents’ experiences of violence in childhood.

    Click here for the dataset​

  • Volunteering and Civic Life in America: Older Adults

    This dataset is the most comprehensive look at volunteering and civic life in the 50 states and 51 cities across the country. Data include volunteer rates and rankings, civic engagement trends, and analysis.

    Click here for the dataset
  • WHO's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE)

    The Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) is run by the World Health Organization's Multi-Country Studies unit in the Information, Evidence and Research Cluster. SAGE is part of the unit's Longitudinal Study Programme which is attempting to compile comprehensive longitudinal data on the health and well-being of adult populations, and the ageing process across different countries, through primary data collection and secondary data analysis.

    Click here for the dataset

  • Wisconsin Longitudinal Study

    The WLS cohort of men and women, born primarily in 1939, precedes by about a decade the bulk of the baby boom generation, which continues to tax social institutions and resources at each stage of life. The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) is a long-term study of a random sample of 10,317 men and women who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957. For this reason, the WLS can provide early indications of trends and problems that will become important as this larger group passes through its 60s. This is in addition to the value of the WLS in obtaining basic information about the life course as such, independent of the cohort's vanguard position with respect to the baby boom. Also, the WLS is the first of the large longitudinal studies of American adolescents, and thus it provides the first large-scale opportunity to study the life course from late adolescence through the early/mid-60s, in the context of a complete record of ability, aspiration, and achievement. The WLS provides an opportunity to study the life course, intergenerational transfers and relationships, family functioning, physical and mental health and well-being, and morbidity and mortality from late adolescence through 2008. WLS data also cover social background, youthful aspirations, schooling, military service, labor market experiences, family characteristics and events, social participation, psychological.

    Click here for the dataset

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